Writing a Law PhD with Latex (4)

Sun 29 June 2014 | tags: Latex, Free Software, PhD, Social Sciences, Oscola, -- (permalink)

This part is relatively easy - we set up another tex file to generate PDFs from individual chapters. Generally, this is more or less the same, with the main difference that we use a different document class and that we insert a placeholder instead of the actual chapters.

Let's edit a new file in the "text" folder called "chapter.tex"

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{scrartcl}

\usepackage[style=oscola]{biblatex}

\usepackage[style=british]{csquotes}

\usepackage{setspace}

\renewcommand{\thesection}{\Roman{section}}
\renewcommand{\thesubsection}{\arabic{subsection}}
\renewcommand{\thesubsubsection}{\alph{subsubsection}}

\begin{document}

\title{chaptertitle}
\author{}
\date{}
\maketitle
\tableofcontents

\doublespacing

\input{chapter_chapternumber/content}

\pagebreak
\singlespacing
\section*{References}
\printbibliography
\end{document}

And that's all! We included two placeholders, one for the title as previously and one for the number so that this file simply includes the correct content.tex file for the chapter. The bibliography will be generated from this chapter only, so only references used in this chapter will be included.

The only other changes to the thesis file is that we use a different document class (scrartcl instead of scrbook), that we generate the title automatically (you could enter your name under author if you submit this somewhere) with the \maketitle command, and that the OSCOLA package does not need the citereset parameter.

Again - we need to commit the change and get used to it:

git add .
git commit -m "Added generic chapter tex file"

Now it's finally time to look at the phd-style file that we simply assumed in the last two parts.